18th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker. Robert McPherson Antiques-235721
18th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker. Robert McPherson Antiques-23572118th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker. Robert McPherson Antiques-23572118th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker. Robert McPherson Antiques-23572118th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker. Robert McPherson Antiques-235721

An 18th Century Meissen Kakeimon Style Beaker from the Collection of Augustus the Strong

An 18th Century Meissen Porcelain Beaker in the Kakiemon Style from the Collection of Augustus the Strong. Decorated with sprigs of fruiting pomegranate exposing their seeds and a sprig of flowering peony. The base with an over-glaze Crossed Swords Mark in blue enamel for Meissen and a wheel engraved Johanneum Inventory mark N : 334 – W.

SOLD



Condition: In poor condition ; a large dark crack 55 mm which then turns left for c.20 mm. A shallow chip to the outer rim c.5 x 5 mm.

Size: Size: Height 6.8 cm (2 3/4 inches)

Provenance: Augustus the Strong (1670 - 1733). The Royal Collection at The Japanese Palace, Dresden, Wheel Engraved Johanneum Inventory mark to the base N : 334 - W.

References: For a pair Meissen Kakiemon beakers and saucers of this design dated c.1725-1730 see : Kakiemon, Une Europe Sous L`Influence Du Japon A Travers La Porcelaine Aux 17eme Et 18eme Siecles Collections Privees (Vincent L`Herrou,Tomate & Risson, undated c.2006) see page 91. A fluted Kakiemon beaker of this design dated to 1729-1731 is in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Room 139, shelf 3, item 9

Stock number: 235721.

Categories: , , .

Meissen Porcelain :

Meissen porcelain was the first hard-paste porcelain, or true porcelain to be developed in Europe. Development of this new hard-paste porcelain by Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus started in 1707. When Tschirnhaus suddenly died, the recipe apparently was handed over to Böttger, who within one week announced to the Elector that he could make porcelain. Böttger refined the formula and with some Dutch co-workers, experienced in firing and painting tiles, the stage was set for the manufacturing of porcelain. In 1709, the Elector established the first Meissen porcelain factory, placed Böttger`s laboratory at Albrechtsburg castle in Meissen and production started officially in 1710. In 1720 Johann Gregorius Höroldt became the director and introduced brilliant colours which made Meissen porcelain famous. The next sculptor, Johann Jakob Kirchner, was the first to make large-scale statues and figurines, especially of Baroque saints. His assistant was Johann Joachim Kaendler; in 1733 Kirchner resigned, and Kaendler took over as chief “modelmaster”. He became the most famous of the Meissen sculptors. Under his direction Meissen produced the series of small figurines, often depicting scenes of gallantry, which brought out the best of the new material. His menagerie of large-scale animals, left in the white, are some of the high points of European porcelain manufacture. His work resulted in the production of exquisite figurines in the rococo style that influenced porcelain making in all of Europe. Supported by assistants like Johann Friedrich Eberlein and Peter Reinecke, he worked until his death in 1775. In 1756, during the Seven Years` War, Prussian troops occupied Meissen, giving Frederick II of Prussia the opportunity to relocate some of the artisans to establish the Königliche Porzellan Manufaktur Berlin. With the changing tastes of the neoclassical period and the rise of Sèvres porcelain in the 1760s, Meissen had to readjust its production, and in the reorganization from 1763, C.W.E. Dietrich of the Dresden Academy became artistic director and Michel-Victor Acier from France became the modelmaster. The practice of impressing numerals that correspond to moulds in the inventory books began in 1763. Sèvres styles and ventures into Neoclassicism, such as matte bisque wares that had the effect of white marble, marked the factory`s output under Count Camillo Marcolini, from 1774.

 

Augustus The Strong :

Augustus the Strong
Augustus II (1670-1733) King of Poland and Elector of Saxony known as Augustus the Strong. Augustus`s great physical strength earned him the nicknames `the Strong`, `Saxon Hercules` and `Iron Hand`. He liked to show that he lived up to his name by breaking horse shoes with his bare hands. His ancestor Cymburgis of Masovia was also noted for her strength. Augustus the Strong owed allegiance to the Imperial Habsburgs as a member of the Order of the Golden Fleece. Augustus the Strong owed allegiance to the Imperial Habsburgs as a member of the Order of the Golden Fleece. As Elector of Saxony, he is perhaps best remembered as a patron of the arts and architecture. He established the Saxon capital of Dresden as a major cultural centre, attracting artists and musicians from across Europe to his court. Augustus also amassed an impressive art collection and built fantastic baroque palaces at Dresden and at Warsaw. As a politician, he is nowadays not held in high esteem in Poland, getting blamed for embroiling the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the Great Northern War. His attempts at internal reforms and at bolstering the royal power are considered to have come to naught, while his policies are said to have allowed the Russian Empire to strengthen its influence over the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
The Japanisches Palais (Japanese Palace) is a Baroque building in Dresden, Germany, on the Neustadt bank of the river Elbe. Built in 1715, it was extended from 1729 until 1731 to store the porcelain collection of Augustus the Strong that is now part of the Dresden Porcelain Collection. However, it was never used for this purpose, and instead served as a library.

 

 

 

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