ARITA c.1670 – 1700 Japanese Porcelain

A Late 17th Century Blue and White Japanese `Gallipot` with the Initials `H.S.` Within a Circle The Rest of the Body Decorated with Birds Among Fruiting Pomegranates, Arita Kilns c.1670-1700.

SOLD

 



Condition: The rim with three deep chips and one shallow chip.

Size: Height : 21 cm (8 1/4 inches)

Provenance:

References:For a similar late 17th century blue and white Gallipot see : Japanese Export Porcelain, Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (Oliver Impey, Hotei Publishing, Amsterdam, 2002) page 105, plate 117. For an inscribed Gallipot described as an apothecary bottle see : Porcelain for Palaces, The Fashion for Japan in Europe 1650 - 1750 (Various authors, The Oriental Ceramic Society,1990. ISBN 0-903421-24-0) page 98, plate 40. For a blue and white Arita Gallipot with the `Star of David` see our `Sold Items`, number 17636. For a polychrome Japanese porcelain illustrating an inscribed Gallipot being used see `Sold Items`, number 19870.

Stock number: 23341

Apothecary Bottle / Gallipot :
The above terms have been used to describe a type of Japanese porcelain vessel with a bulbous base and a tapering neck with a flange below the rim, the rim itself sometimes has a flange. The flanges were there to facilitate the attachment of a cloth over the top of the bottle. They are very much associated with Japanese export ware and were made from about 1670 in various sizes and shapes. Some of these bottles might have been used as in apothecaries but presumably some were used for wine. Apothecary bottles are a well known item in Japanese Porcelain of the 17th and 18th Centuries, some of which have the initials of members of the V.O.C. (The Dutch East India Company) on their base or side. For two of the examples sold by us see 17636 (see our `Sold Items`) for a bottle of this shape with the Star of David. There are a number of rare early 18th Century Japanese Porcelain teabowls and saucers known that clearly shows two Japanese men having a pick-nick with a food box, chop-sticks, a plate, cup and an Apothecary bottle. The bulbous shape bottle is what is clearly referred to as an apothecary bottle with its globular body, tall neck and distinctive double flanges. The side is painted with `F W` in red. It is interesting to see the bottle, clearly made for Europeans, shown being used by the Japanese in in a domestic setting, presumably for wine or water rather than as an apothecary bottle. See our `Sold Items` numbers 19870 and 20606 for two saucers with this unusual design. For a Japanese porcelain apothecary bottle entirely decorated in Holland see 21175. For a group of Japanese apothecary bottles see : Japanese Export Porcelain, Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (Oliver Impey, Hotei Publishing, Amsterdam,2002) pages 104 and 105. Also see : Porcelain for Palaces, The Fashion for Japan in Europe 1650 – 1750 (Various authors, The Oriental Ceramic Society,1990. ISBN 0-903421-24-0) page 98. Apothecary Bottle / Gallipot :
The above terms have been used to describe a type of Japanese porcelain vessel with a bulbous base and a tapering neck with a flange below the rim, the rim itself sometimes has a flange. The flanges were there to facilitate the attachment of a cloth over the top of the bottle. They are very much associated with Japanese export ware and were made from about 1670 in various sizes and shapes. Some of these bottles might have been used as in apothecaries but presumably some were used for wine. Apothecary bottles are a well known item in Japanese Porcelain of the 17th and 18th Centuries, some of which have the initials of members of the V.O.C. (The Dutch East India Company) on their base or side. For two of the examples sold by us see 17636 (see our `Sold Items`) for a bottle of this shape with the Star of David. There are a number of rare early 18th Century Japanese Porcelain teabowls and saucers known that clearly shows two Japanese men having a pick-nick with a food box, chop-sticks, a plate, cup and an Apothecary bottle. The bulbous shape bottle is what is clearly referred to as an apothecary bottle with its globular body, tall neck and distinctive double flanges. The side is painted with `F W` in red. It is interesting to see the bottle, clearly made for Europeans, shown being used by the Japanese in in a domestic setting, presumably for wine or water rather than as an apothecary bottle. See our `Sold Items` numbers 19870 and 20606 for two saucers with this unusual design. For a Japanese porcelain apothecary bottle entirely decorated in Holland see 21175. For a group of Japanese apothecary bottles see : Japanese Export Porcelain, Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (Oliver Impey, Hotei Publishing, Amsterdam,2002) pages 104 and 105. Also see : Porcelain for Palaces, The Fashion for Japan in Europe 1650 – 1750 (Various authors, The Oriental Ceramic Society,1990. ISBN 0-903421-24-0) page 98.

Stock number: 23341.