A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Bowl

c.1670 - 1690

An Ogee Shaped Shallow Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl, Probably Kakiemon Kilns, c.1670 – 1690. This Japanese porcelain bowl is made of Nigoshide porcelain and decorated with bright Kakiemon enamels. This specific type of porcelain, Nigoshide, refers to a fine milky-white porcelain body that glows with a warm tint, in Japan it is said to be reminiscent of rice-water. The well of the bowl is painted with a typical Kakiemon design, Sho-Chiku-Bai, the ‘Three Friends of Winter’ : Pine, Prunus and Bamboo. The symbols of perseverance and strength : The pine tree doesn’t lose its needles, even in the coldest winter, and lives through countless winters. Prunus (cherry family) is the first to flower, heralding the arrival of spring, even if the weather is wintery. The bamboo is evergreen, its strong stems stay upright against heavy winds and snow. It seems there is only one stem of bamboo in the design, the top of the sectional stem rises above the pine tree. The border is of brightly coloured prunus flowers, set out in an asymmetric way. For other Kakiemon porcelain bowl from our Sold Archive, see below.

 

See Below For More Photographs and Information.

RESERVED

Condition
There is a flake shaped chip to the inner rim, above a red prunus flower head, see the two close up photographs in the Photograph Gallery below. The chip is approximately 4 x 4 mm.
Size
Diameter 13.7 cm (5 1/2 inches). Depth 4.9 cm (2 inches).
Provenance
N/A
Stock number
27027

Photos

Information

Kakiemon Porcelain

While there is much debate about what was actually made at the Kakiemon kilns, and was made at Arita, it seems clear that the Nigoshide body was exclusively used at Kakiemon. There has been allot of Japanese research undertaken at the Kakiemon kilns, and fragments of porcelain as well as moulds have been recovered from the kiln sites, unfortunately I have only found this information in Japanese books (in Japanese).  Nigoshide refers to a fine milky-white porcelain body that glows with a warm tint, in Japan it is said to be reminiscent of rice-water. While white porcelain usually sports a blue tint, Nigoshide porcelain has a soft milky-white appearance. Nigoshide was invented in the 1670s as the perfect porcelain body for complimenting the brilliant polychrome overglaze enamel colours created at Kakiemon. It is notable that the Kakiemon enamel decorated pieces with underglaze blue do not use the Nigoshide body, yet fragments of this type have been recovered from the Kakiemon kiln sits. The main period of production of Kakiemon Nigoshide ware was from about 1670 to 1690. Due to lack of the right materials and economic cutbacks, Nigoshide porcelain went out of production by the mid-18th century, however there was a notable decline in production from around 1690.

Kakiemon decoration is usually of high quality, often delicate and with well-balanced asymmetric designs. The designs were normally quite sparse emphasizing the. Kakiemon porcelain was decorated with a great variety of imaginative designs which include elements such as the `banded hedge`, `flying squirrel`, and the `Quail and Millet` design in the West. The `Three Friends of Winter` were also a very popular group of designs, other subject taken from nature include flowers (especially the chrysanthemum, the national flower of Japan) as well as birds and rock-work. Figural subjects such as the so-called `Hob in the Well` were also popular. This design illustrates a Chinese folk tale where a sage saves his friend who has fallen into a large fish-bowl by throwing stones at it, breaking open the pot. Banded-Hedges were a formal device within Japanese traditional gardens, they were often incorporated in designs, includes `The Three Friends of Winter` (Pine, Bamboo and Prunus). These three plants signify perseverance, as neither the pine nor the bamboo shed their leaves in winter and the plumb (Prunus) flowers at the very end of the winter, heralding the arrival of spring.

 

Kakiemon Bowls 

Robert McPherson Antiques Sold Archive

A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26994
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26994
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26068
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26068
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26008
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl - Robert McPherson Antiques - 26008
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl. The shallow bellflower, called Kikyō, form has everted ‘petals’, it is painted using Kakiemon enamels with Chrysanthemum, the national flower of Japan.This understated subtle asymmetrical design is typically Japanese and is at its best on Kakiemon wares. The use of space shows off the pure white Nigoshide (milky white) porcelain to its full effect. Kakiemon decoration is usually of high quality, often delicate and with well-balanced asymmetric designs. These designs were normally quite sparse emphasizing the fine white porcelain known in Japan as Nigoshide (milky white porcelain). A Pair of Kakiemon Bowls of the Same Shape and Design, from Burghley House are illustrated in the catalogue : The Burghley Porcelains, An Exhibition from The Burghley House Collection and Based on the 1688 Inventory and 1690 Devonshire Schedule. See below the Photograph Gallery for one of the Burghley bowls and other references. The opaque white milky Nigoshide porcelain was used on the finest pieces, it appears that it was reserved for fine quality enamelled decoration and the secret of its production was guarded well. Kakiemon porcelain was decorated with a great variety of imaginative designs which include elements such many of which are well known in the West. Elements of these designs acquired European names early on. For example `banded hedge`, these are actually a brushwood fences, `flying squirrel`, these are tree shrews and the`Quail and Millet` design. The `Three Friends of Winter` were also a very popular group of designs, other subject taken from nature include flowers (especially the chrysanthemum, the national flower of Japan) as well as birds and rock-work. Figural subjects such as the `Hob in the Well` were also popular. This design illustrates a Chinese folk tale where a sage saves his friend who has fallen into a large fish-bowl by throwing stones at it, breaking open the pot. Banded-Hedges were a formal device within Japanese traditional gardens, they were often incorporated in designs, includes `The Three Friends of Winter` (Pine, Bamboo and Prunus). These three plants signify perseverance, as neither the pine nor the bamboo shed their leaves in winter and the plumb (Prunus) flowers at the very end of the winter, heralding the arrival of spring. See below for more photographs and references. SOLD Condition In perfect condition, some minute firing spects to the glaze. Size Diameter 12.6 cm (4 3/4 inches) Provenance An English private collection formed in the 1960s. Stock number 26109 References The Burghley Porcelains, An Exhibition from The Burghley House Collection and Based on the 1688 Inventory and 1690 Devonshire Schedule (Japan Society, New York, 1986. ISBN 0-913304-23-9). Page 249, item 104.
A 17th Century Japanese Kakiemon Porcelain Bowl. The shallow bellflower, called Kikyō, form has everted ‘petals’, it is painted using Kakiemon enamels with Chrysanthemum, the national flower of Japan.This understated subtle asymmetrical design is typically Japanese and is at its best on Kakiemon wares. The use of space shows off the pure white Nigoshide (milky white) porcelain to its full effect. Kakiemon decoration is usually of high quality, often delicate and with well-balanced asymmetric designs. These designs were normally quite sparse emphasizing the fine white porcelain known in Japan as Nigoshide (milky white porcelain). A Pair of Kakiemon Bowls of the Same Shape and Design, from Burghley House are illustrated in the catalogue : The Burghley Porcelains, An Exhibition from The Burghley House Collection and Based on the 1688 Inventory and 1690 Devonshire Schedule. See below the Photograph Gallery for one of the Burghley bowls and other references.
The opaque white milky Nigoshide porcelain was used on the finest pieces, it appears that it was reserved for fine quality enamelled decoration and the secret of its production was guarded well. Kakiemon porcelain was decorated with a great variety of imaginative designs which include elements such many of which are well known in the West. Elements of these designs acquired European names early on. For example `banded hedge`, these are actually a brushwood fences, `flying squirrel`, these are tree shrews and the`Quail and Millet` design. The `Three Friends of Winter` were also a very popular group of designs, other subject taken from nature include flowers (especially the chrysanthemum, the national flower of Japan) as well as birds and rock-work. Figural subjects such as the `Hob in the Well` were also popular. This design illustrates a Chinese folk tale where a sage saves his friend who has fallen into a large fish-bowl by throwing stones at it, breaking open the pot. Banded-Hedges were a formal device within Japanese traditional gardens, they were often incorporated in designs, includes `The Three Friends of Winter` (Pine, Bamboo and Prunus). These three plants signify perseverance, as neither the pine nor the bamboo shed their leaves in winter and the plumb (Prunus) flowers at the very end of the winter, heralding the arrival of spring.
See below for more photographs and references.
SOLD
Condition
In perfect condition, some minute firing spects to the glaze.
Size
Diameter 12.6 cm (4 3/4 inches)
Provenance
An English private collection formed in the 1960s.
Stock number
26109
References
The Burghley Porcelains, An Exhibition from The Burghley House Collection and Based on the 1688 Inventory and 1690 Devonshire Schedule (Japan Society, New York, 1986. ISBN 0-913304-23-9). Page 249, item 104.

 

A Rare Dutch Decorated Kakiemon Style Dish

Robert McPherson Antiques

Sold Archive - 24553.

A rare large Chinese export porcelain saucer shaped dish, entirely decorated in Holland in the Kakiemon style with the ‘Three Friends of Winter’. The porcelain is late Kangxi or early Yongzheng and was made in around 1720, the decoration dates to c.1720-1725, it includes ‘banded-hedges’ and is quite faithful to the Japanese Kakiemon original. It is highly unusual to find such a large piece of Chinese porcelain that is entirely enamelled in Holland, plain Chinese dishes of this size are extremely rare if they exist at all, so it is highly likely this dish was ordered especially with the intention of decorating it when it arrived. Therefore the Chinese porcelain dates to c.1720-25.
A rare large Chinese export porcelain saucer shaped dish, entirely decorated in Holland in the Kakiemon style with the ‘Three Friends of Winter’. The porcelain is late Kangxi or early Yongzheng and was made in around 1720, the decoration dates to c.1720-1725, it includes ‘banded-hedges’ and is quite faithful to the Japanese Kakiemon original. It is highly unusual to find such a large piece of Chinese porcelain that is entirely enamelled in Holland, plain Chinese dishes of this size are extremely rare if they exist at all, so it is highly likely this dish was ordered especially with the intention of decorating it when it arrived. Therefore the Chinese porcelain dates to c.1720-25.